Archives
  • Updated
  • 0

Williamson County residents — and those with connections to the county — are asking how they can help. There are a number of things which can be done, both monetary donations or donations of items needed by those affected by the flood.

Archives
  • Updated
  • 0

The outpouring of Williamson County residents' generosity for flood victims has caused Graceworks Ministries and the American Red Cross to open a new site to accept donations at Rolling Hills Community Church, 1810 Columbia Ave., in the old Georgia Boot factory.

Editorial
  • Updated
  • 0

Words cannot express the devastation last weekend’s floods have brought to Middle Tennessee, Williamson County and to Franklin. Franklin was blessed not to be hit as hard as our neighboring cities to the north, but the damage to some of our neighborhoods and businesses is just as important. That is why on Sunday I issued a State of Emergency for Franklin to help our citizens rebuild their lives with assistance from state and federal officials. Another more immediate emergency is the order from the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation to eliminate all non-essential water use. This is very important to our community and health and we ask all citizens to only use water necessary for personal health and hygiene. Currently, the water quality is good and drinkable and we want to keep it that way.

Archives
  • Updated
  • 0

TDOT crews were out early this morning reopening major state highways that go through Franklin, including Hillsboro Road and portions, if not all, of Lewisburg Pike from Carnton Lane to Mack Hatcher Bypass. Franklin Road and the bridge over the Harpeth was reopened yesterday.

Archives
  • Updated
  • 0

Franklin Mayor John Schroer and City Adminsitrator Eric Stuckey took to the air this morning to survey the damage done to Franklin by massive flooding that has left hundreds homelss, dozens of structures destroyed and many wondering how to recover because of a lack of appropriate flood insurance.

Archives
  • Updated
  • 0

Franklin Firefighters responded to a house fire on Burlington Pass about 1:52 a.m. Monday in Fieldstone Farms. That same neighborhood had been evacuated the previous day due to flooding. Firefighters battled the flames in four feet deep water and were able to contain the fire within about 20 minutes. One home was destroyed. A second home received severe damage and another home received minor damage. Two occupants were in the adjacent home and were able to get out before firefighters arrived on the scene. No injuries were reported.

Archives
  • Updated
  • 0

Today Mayor John Schroer and city officials have issued a state of emergency due to the flooding. The State of Emergency will help the city request assistance from County, State and Federal officials. A curfew has been issued from dusk until dawn, 6 p.m.-6 a.m. requiring citizens to stay home. It is very dangerous to drive in night time conditions when you can’t tell the depth of the water.

Archives
  • Updated
  • 0

Government officials across Williamson County are gathering today to begin to assess the damage caused by more than 12 inches of rain that fell across the county, causing water mains in Brentwood to collapse and officials across the county to rescue hundreds of people from their homes or vehicles.

Editorial
  • Updated
  • 0

The column you’re reading right now is actually the column you should’ve been reading last week just a couple of days before Mother’s Day and it would have been all about how wonderful mamas are and how much we love them and how everybody has one except for maybe local politicians because they are reptilian in nature and mostly non-human but during the time I usually sit down in front of my writing machine with a cup of coffee to my left and a new can of Skoal to my right and either John Prine or Van Morrison or Creedence or Alvin and the Chipmunks in my headphones I was standing here in my little office, soaking wet, with a plastic garbage bag in my hand and trying to decide if any of the stuff I’ve accumulated in my fifty years upon this earth was worth keeping because the Harpeth River pitched a fit and jumped her banks a half mile away and was now less than a hundred yards from my house and still trying to make up her mind if she was going to go further.

  • Updated
  • 0

Through the years, in times of need, residents of Williamson County are the first to act. Their generosity and compassion has become legendary. Whenever a disaster hits – no matter where – Williamson County residents and local government officials are quick to open their hearts, their calendars and their checkbooks to assist victims.

  • Updated
  • 0

“Williamson County was tested, tested strong and I’m here to tell you, we met the test,” Williamson County Sheriff Jeff Long told the Williamson County Board of Commissioners Monday.

Archives
  • Updated
  • 0

Franklin Police urge residents to apply a critical eye and do their due diligence when hiring crews to assist with home repairs in the aftermath of this past weekend’s flooding. Past tragedies and natural disasters have prompted individuals with criminal intent to solicit their services, or ask for contributions purportedly for a charitable organization.

  • Updated
  • 0

With so many elements over which a farmer has little to no control, farming has always been known as a hard way to make a living, but for some, it’s the only way to make a living.

  • Updated
  • 0

The Brentwood Fire & Rescue Department held its annual awards ceremony Saturday and the highlights of the evening included Capt. Mark Duffield receiving the Medal of Valor for his outstanding efforts during the May flood, and Firefighter John Russ being named Firefighter of the Year for 2010.

  • Updated
  • 0

The Williamson County Community Development Department has begun the application process for the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s hazard mitigation grant program. This program will focus on properties in mapped special flood hazard areas, which suffered substantial damage in the May 2010 flooding. If approved, the grant would require a 12.5 percent county contribution toward the acquisition and demolition of qualified properties.

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.