Brentwood moves forward with land acquisition for pump station storage facility

  • 0
  • 2 min to read
Brentwood pump station

The proposed property for the new Brentwood pump station storage facility is located behind Christ Presbyterian Church and Academy between Old Hickory Boulevard and Hillsboro Road.

The city of Brentwood is moving forward with its plan to build a new $7 million pump station storage facility to better handle overflows during wet weather. 

At Monday’s city commission meeting, commissioners unanimously approved a resolution to allow the city to move forward with land acquisition needed to build the storage facility. 

The city currently contracts with Metro Nashville for treatment of its sewage. Extensive work on a new storage facility started after the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation issued Brentwood and Metro Nashville an agreed order in 2006 which required Brentwood to develop a corrective action plan to reduce overflows at its pump station.

The city’s current pumping station is shared jointly with Metro Nashville, and the new storage tank is proposed to be built next to the current infrastructure, according to city staff notes.

The proposed 44-acre property is located behind Christ Presbyterian Church and Academy between Old Hickory Boulevard and Hillsboro Road. The city and property owners are currently in contract negotiations and will be in the coming weeks as an additional appraisal is conducted, City Manager Kirk Bednar explained. 

“We have been in contract negotiations and discussions with the property owners for several months,” he said. “We have made an offer to them either to buy the entire tract, if that’s their desire, or to buy roughly 4 to 5 acres for the tank itself.”

The city’s appraisal of the 40-acre property is $1.11 million, however, negotiations are still active. If the city and property owners do not come to an agreement, the resolution states that condemnation of the property as the last step the city could take.

“Our hope is always to never go to condemnation, but this is a situation, in this case, where that really is the sole property that it needs to be on to function appropriately for our operations,” Bednar said. It’s always our last resort.” 

The possible condemnation portion of the resolution had Commissioner Mark Gorman concerned. He made a motion to remove that action from the amendment, however, it did not pass after a 5-2 vote.

“This is one of those that I really struggle with while the sewer issue is at a crisis,” he said. “I really struggle with the condemnation at this point. It sounds like things are not quite done from a negotiating perspective.”

Commissioner Anne Dunn saw the amendment differently. She said possible property condemnation as a difficult action to take but necessary from the perspective of “amenity versus real need in the community.”

“This is a difficult one,” she said. “I’ve never been in favor of condemnation. We do it with roads because we service hundreds, if not thousands, of people by those projects.

“I felt that we’ve had sewer issues. I have not felt that they were in crisis. I felt that we’ve had a master plan and we’ve been working for it.”

Most commissioners and city staff indicated the property owners involved may be willing to come to an agreement, however, negotiations have not been finalized. All commissioners unanimously voted to move forward with acquiring the land needed to build the future storage tank. 

The pump station storage facility is estimated to be completed by the end of 2022.

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.