You are the owner of this article.
You have permission to edit this article.
Edit

Williamson County parent group files as public education PAC

  • Updated
  • 2
  • 4 min to read
Williamson Strong logo

Williamson Strong is a parent advocacy group for public education, founded in 2014.

After seeing the conclusion of years of legal proceedings last year concerning Williamson Strong’s identity as a parent advocacy group, not an unregistered political action committee, the group has now officially formed a PAC.

“We officially filed to be a PAC in order to raise money for candidates who are truly public school advocates,” the group wrote in a blog post last week, noting that it will engage in elections for the Williamson County Schools Board of Education, Williamson County Board of Commissioners and perhaps the Tennessee General Assembly and other local governmental bodies as well.

Williamson Strong is a group of WCS parents, led by former WCS school board member Anne McGraw, aiming to provide information about the goings on of the district and increase parental engagement through its social media platforms and online presence.

According to a recent blog post, one of the group’s goals with its PAC is to keep partisanship out of the school district, saying that public education has recently become a “political playground.” The group’s recent social media posts have been at odds with another vocal parent group in the community involved in school-related discussions: Moms for Liberty.

The decision to form a PAC comes about a year after the group saw the conclusion of a lawsuit dating back about six years.

In 2014, a former member of the Williamson County Schools Board of Education, Susan Curlee, filed a 100-page complaint with the Tennessee Registry of Election Finance claiming that Williamson Strong engaged in political activities that would qualify it as an unregistered PAC. Several months later, after hearing the complaint, the registry fined the organization $5,000.

After Williamson Strong filed an appeal, an administrative law judge ordered that the charges should be dropped, but the organization wanted to go further, fighting for a reimbursement of legal expenses. After over two years, a Tennessee judge ordered that the state must pay almost $167,000 to Williamson Strong’s attorneys.

Last year, a Williamson Strong member shared with the Williamson Herald that the group’s goal from the start was to keep the public informed, which she believes has been accomplished along the way.

For more information about Williamson Strong, visit www.WilliamsonStrong.org.

After seeing the conclusion of years of legal proceedings last year concerning Williamson Strong’s identity as a parent advocacy group, not an unregistered political action committee, the group has now officially formed a PAC.

“We officially filed to be a PAC in order to raise money for candidates who are truly public school advocates,” the group wrote in a blog post last week, noting that it will engage in elections for the Williamson County Schools Board of Education, Williamson County Board of Commissioners and perhaps the Tennessee General Assembly and other local governmental bodies as well.

Williamson Strong is a group of WCS parents, led by former WCS school board member Anne McGraw, aiming to provide information about the goings on of the district and increase parental engagement through its social media platforms and online presence.

According to a recent blog post, one of the group’s goals with its PAC is to keep partisanship out of the school district, saying that public education has recently become a “political playground.” The group’s recent social media posts have been at odds with another vocal parent group in the community involved in school-related discussions: Moms for Liberty.

The decision to form a PAC comes about a year after the group saw the conclusion of a lawsuit dating back about six years.

In 2014, a former member of the Williamson County Schools Board of Education, Susan Curlee, filed a 100-page complaint with the Tennessee Registry of Election Finance claiming that Williamson Strong engaged in political activities that would qualify it as an unregistered PAC. Several months later, after hearing the complaint, the registry fined the organization $5,000.

After Williamson Strong filed an appeal, an administrative law judge ordered that the charges should be dropped, but the organization wanted to go further, fighting for a reimbursement of legal expenses. After over two years, a Tennessee judge ordered that the state must pay almost $167,000 to Williamson Strong’s attorneys.

Last year, a Williamson Strong member shared with the Williamson Herald that the group’s goal from the start was to keep the public informed, which she believes has been accomplished along the way.

For more information about Williamson Strong, visit www.WilliamsonStrong.org.

After seeing the conclusion of years of legal proceedings last year concerning Williamson Strong’s identity as a parent advocacy group, not an unregistered political action committee, the group has now officially formed a PAC.

“We officially filed to be a PAC in order to raise money for candidates who are truly public school advocates,” the group wrote in a blog post last week, noting that it will engage in elections for the Williamson County Schools Board of Education, Williamson County Board of Commissioners and perhaps the Tennessee General Assembly and other local governmental bodies as well.

Williamson Strong is a group of WCS parents, led by former WCS school board member Anne McGraw, aiming to provide information about the goings on of the district and increase parental engagement through its social media platforms and online presence.

According to a recent blog post, one of the group’s goals with its PAC is to keep partisanship out of the school district, saying that public education has recently become a “political playground.” The group’s recent social media posts have been at odds with another vocal parent group in the community involved in school-related discussions: Moms for Liberty.

The decision to form a PAC comes about a year after the group saw the conclusion of a lawsuit dating back about six years.

In 2014, a former member of the Williamson County Schools Board of Education, Susan Curlee, filed a 100-page complaint with the Tennessee Registry of Election Finance claiming that Williamson Strong engaged in political activities that would qualify it as an unregistered PAC. Several months later, after hearing the complaint, the registry fined the organization $5,000.

After Williamson Strong filed an appeal, an administrative law judge ordered that the charges should be dropped, but the organization wanted to go further, fighting for a reimbursement of legal expenses. After over two years, a Tennessee judge ordered that the state must pay almost $167,000 to Williamson Strong’s attorneys.

Last year, a Williamson Strong member shared with the Williamson Herald that the group’s goal from the start was to keep the public informed, which she believes has been accomplished along the way.

For more information about Williamson Strong, visit www.WilliamsonStrong.org.

(2) comments

davidmh

The article says > "one of the group’s goals with its PAC is to keep partisanship out of the school district, saying that public education has recently become a “political playground.” How does that make sense? It is like saying "We are starting a Political Action Committee so we can be non-political.

It then says > "it will engage in elections for the Williamson County Schools Board of Education, Williamson County Board of Commissioners and perhaps the Tennessee General Assembly and other local governmental bodies as well."

What the article seems to say is that Williamson Strong is non-partisan but Moms for Liberty is partisan. How is Williamson Strong "non-partisan" if they are forming a PAC and going to be involved in every political race, including for the WCS Board? By definition, being politically active is "partisan".

How many Republicans or conservatives do you think Williamson Strong will support? It sounds like they are going to greatly increase partisanship in WCS Board elections and their PAC will lead to the creation of other PAC's in an effort to counter Williamson Strong's political activism. It sounds like Williamson Strong is going to do exactly what they are criticizing and turn Williamson County public education into a “political playground.” Will the Herald attack conservative PAC's but say the Liberal PAC's are "non-partisan"? That is what I expect.

KristiP

David, Moms for Liberty is a 501(c)(4) not a PAC. Which means a social welfare organization designated as a 501(c)(4) can engage in some political activity. Unlike the restrictions for 501(c)(3) organizations, 501(c)(4) organizations can legally participate in political activity in support of or opposition to candidates for office. These political activities cannot be the organization's primary activities and cannot be direct donations to a candidate for office or a candidate's committee. They also don't have to disclose their donors. Williamson Strong is a PAC, their purpose of raising and spending money to elect and defeat candidates. They do have to disclose their donors which is open to the public. There are many non-partisan PACs that support candidates from both sides. Williamson Strong's mission is to support school board candidates(non-partisan) that are advocates of public education. Are you saying no school board members are Republican? I am confident we have some great Republican school board members, that want to champion public education.

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.