SEARCH THE HERALD:

> sign up for Herald e-news

A former deputy-turned-author talks about life behind the Blue Line

Someone is fi nally talking about the fear and the faith of the men and women in law enforcement. That someone is Becky Coyle in her collection of true stories. “Miracles Behind the Blue Line,” details Coyle’s personal experiences – sometimes harrowing experiences – as a member of the Williamson County Sheriff’s Department and the lessons she learned along the way.

Someone is fi nally talking about the fear and the faith of the men and women in law enforcement. That someone is Becky Coyle in her collection of true stories. “Miracles Behind the Blue Line,” details Coyle’s personal experiences – sometimes harrowing experiences – as a member of the Williamson County Sheriff’s Department and the lessons she learned along the way.

“Law enforcement is raunchy work,” Coyle said.

An aspiring singer/songwriter, Coyle came to Nashville from her home in Eastern Kentucky to get herself and her three young children away from her abusive husband.

With virtually no money, she needed a job that offered more than tips, she explains in the book’s introduction. The only thing that piqued her interest was a job in corrections at the Williamson County Jail. After a few years, in 2003, she was promoted to deputy sheriff. Coyle graduated from the Law Enforcement Training Academy in 2004, and sang the National Anthem at her own graduation.

Coyle left the sheriff’s offi ce in 2010 to pursue her career as an author, a public speaker and a Christian music artist.

“It’s just a miracle how [the book] came about,” she said.

It started when, as a rookie Coyle, who had just begun to work on her Christian faith, began writing her daily activities and her prayers in a journal. Years later as she read those journals she began to see evidence of God’s hand in her life and she “was amazed.”

“I began to pay attention, studying his word and I began to believe in God’s Word,” she added. “I don’t want anybody to miss out on living a miraculous life – especially my brothers and sisters in law enforcement.”

The fi rst story in the book occurred when Coyle was still a rookie deputy. It was also the fi rst time she actually felt God leading her, she said.

The department was searching for a suspect driving a dark vehicle, “possibly a truck that rode low to the ground,” who was accused of breaking into area churches and homes. While Coyle was about to serve an order of protection in a rural area of the county, a message came over the radio the department had just obtained an arrest warrant for assault on the guy she was to serve the order – he beat his wife so bad the night before she landed in the hospital.

After no one answered Coyle’s knock on the door, she walked away and spotted a red truck taking off across a fi eld behind the house. Confl icted because she didn’t want to appear weak, Coyle did what she knew was right and called for backup.

At the same time her backup, Deputy Joe Burns, showed up as the red truck returned. The order was peacefully served and the man was arrested and put into Burns’ car.

As Coyle followed Burns back to the offi ce to write the report, she was going over the incident and questioning whether she should remain in law enforcement when a small, black truck with a blue tarp tied over the bed passed her

“I can’t explain how I knew who was in that truck,” she wrote. “I just knew.”

The rookie radioed she was in pursuit of the burglary suspect and took off with lights and sirens blaring. She followed the suspect down a dirt driveway to what a known drug house – except she didn’t know. The suspect continued across a fi eld toward another entrance to the main road. Coyle instinctively turned her car around and made it to the entrance to block his access with the patrol car before he arrived. Within seconds she had the suspect cuffed and off to jail in her patrol car. Her "life was changed forever," she said. Other stories include a diabetic who officers couldn't find but knew was about to go into a diabetic coma and the Mother’s Day miracle of talking a man with a gun out of suicide on her fi rst day as a crisis negotiator. He pulled the trigger but the gun didn’t go off. After later checking the .357 revolver officers found it was fully functioning.

“Miracles Behind the Blue Line” is about police officers, but it doesn’t matter what career you’re in, “Godwill open your heart if you let him in,” Coyle said.

“I was scared about writing the book and the reaction of those I loved and respected in law enforcement. The impact was different than what I thought it would be.

“As a member of law enforcement, we learn to put on a mask. I didn’t want anyone to know I was afraid, but many are saying, ‘We need this. Everyone needs to know that we’re all afraid.’”

“Miracles Behind the Blue Line” is available for sale at The Bean Coffee Bistro in Franklin, The Old Curiosity Book Shop in Columbia, at www.BeckyCoyle.com, www.Amazon.com and www.BarnesandNoble.com.

Posted on: 3/15/2013

 
 

WILLIAMSON HERALD :: 1117 Columbia Avenue :: P.O. Box 681359 :: Franklin, TN 37068
615.790.6465, phone :: 615.790.7551, fax ::
contact@WILLIAMSONHERALD.com

Copyright 2006, WILLIAMSONHERALD.com. All rights reserved. ::
Privacy Policy ::
Advertise ::
Feedback