SEARCH THE HERALD:

> sign up for Herald e-news

Supporting a hometown charity: Hardcastle sees opportunity to lend a hand

 

Cathy and Loy Hardcastle hosted the volunteer dinner for Wine Down Main this week at their home on Fair Street.

When Loy Hardcastle was growing up in Franklin his father made certain his afternoons after school were busy.

“I would leave Franklin Elementary School, which was right down here at Five Points, and walk to Main Street,” he recalled nostalgically of his youth.
 
 In those days, his father Loy, Sr. owned Hardcastle Motors, located on the other side of the Franklin Theatre, near Loy’s office today at Bob Parks Realty LLC.
 
“When I started the first grade he wanted me to come down to the dealership after school. You could walk all over Main Street.”
 
If Loy wasn’t “helping out” one of the service mechanics who worked for his dad, he would manage to take in a movie or two next door thanks to the generosity of longtime owner Herbert Bowen.
 
“Mr. Bowen used my Dad’s Nashville phone line to order candy and Cokes for the theatre. He would let us come in and watch a movie for free.”
 
Back then it was long distance to call Nashville, and Hardcastle Motors had something Bowen didn’t, a Nashville telephone line.
 
This businessman’s exchange gave Loy, his mother Marjorie and his siblings a fun activity in town.
 
It was a special time in Franklin for Hardcastle, and it is partially that memory that has propelled him to get involved in an organization that has at its core the mission of making the lives of children better.
 
Sponsoring the 13th annual Wine Down Main Street event is a natural fit since he said he has been donating a percentage of his proceeds from realty sales to the non-profit regularly for years.
 
“It’s a no-brainer. That fact that the Boys and Girls Clubs helps people right in your community,” is what excites this supporter.
 
For Loy Hardcastle community represents the future—and family. 
 
“It’s just that you have to search your own conscience. You see your own grandchildren…and you hope somebody will be taking care of these kids in our community like I’m trying to take care of mine.”
 
He and his wife Cathy have eleven grandchildren (nine living in Franklin) between them, and it’s a role that has tugged at Loy’s heart.
 
“You see the opportunity the second time around. That second time around you’re older, and the reality is you’ve missed out on a lot with your own kids because of working and building a career.”
 
Hardcastle, who says he is amazed at the amount of love and supervision offered through the Boys and Girls Clubs, tries to encourage others to take a closer look at this grassroots, well-managed community program.
 
Hardcastle has witnessed the growth of this club since its earliest days getting established with the leadership of founding director Carter Savage.
 
Today, he gives Denise Carothers credit for responding faithfully to a need in her community.
 
“When I visited the Club I was really impressed with the supervision they have after school. It was kind of a continuation of school. I saw people really working with the kids, helping them with homework”
 
Next weekend, you might see Loy and Cathy walking from their home on Fair Street to Wine Down Main.
Rather than getting involved in the wine pouring, Hardcastle said he will be doing what he knows best—talking to old friends and making new ones.
 
That, he said, was how his father learned how to be successful in a business that always had plenty of competition.
As a realtor who began selling homes and land after a long career in the automotive business, Loy Hardcastle tries to use the tools of loyalty and customer service to further his reach in the real estate market.
 
Whether that is by being available 24-hours a day, creating a humorous advertising campaign that involves making light of himself or possibly entertaining with his musical talents, this Franklin native makes certain he brings a smile to the face of those who cross his path.
 
Look for Loy on Main Street. His famed horn-rimmed glasses and quintessential Southern-drawl set him apart. 
If he’s not too busy talking about the real estate market, he may just share a story or two about his other love—music. 
 

Posted on: 10/27/2013

 
 

WILLIAMSON HERALD :: 1117 Columbia Avenue :: P.O. Box 681359 :: Franklin, TN 37068
615.790.6465, phone :: 615.790.7551, fax ::
contact@WILLIAMSONHERALD.com

Copyright 2006, WILLIAMSONHERALD.com. All rights reserved. ::
Privacy Policy ::
Advertise ::
Feedback